Designing is like kissing a bunch of frogs to find a prince – Lesson 1 I learned

Lesson 1 : Decreases don’t have to go in the direction of the peak!

So about six months ago I decided that I was going to try my hand at designing knit patterns, specifically lace shawls. How difficult could it be, I have been knitting for over 45 years and lace for more than 25 years. Wow I was in for a surprise. Because I was always knitting someone else’s patterns I didn’t stop to notice how decreases and increases played together.

So say you are trying to create a peakĀ using knit two togethers (k2tog) and slip slip knits (ssk) paired with yarn overs (yo) , you would naturally think the decreases should go in the direction of the peak you are trying to create, ah but not so fast grasshopper. You can actually have the decreases go in the opposite direction of the peak and still get a peak. The difference is you will get a more pronounced ridge of stitches if the decreases go in the direction of the peak versus if they don’t. See the examples below.

Decreases go in the direction of the peak

Decreases go in the direction of the peak resulting in a distinct stitch line as the peak is formed

decreases going in direction of peak

Charted peak with decreases going in the direction of the peak

 

decreases do not go in the direction of peak

decreases do not go in the direction of peak, resulting in no distinct stitch line as the peak is formed

decreases going against the peak

chart where decreases are not going in the direction of the peak

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